Naelyn Pike , 17, San Carlos Apache reservation: ‘Our ancestors are looking at the people with tears in their eyes because they know all the pain and suffering yet to come. They know there is no tomorrow for those yet to be born.’

Naelyn Pike, 17, San Carlos Apache reservation: ‘Our ancestors are looking at the people with tears in their eyes because they know all the pain and suffering yet to come. They know there is no tomorrow for those yet to be born.’

  Vincent Night Horse Fox , 25, White Shield, North Dakota: ‘I come to support Standing Rock to fight against the pipeline. I want clean water for my family and all living things that walk on mother Earth.’

Vincent Night Horse Fox, 25, White Shield, North Dakota: ‘I come to support Standing Rock to fight against the pipeline. I want clean water for my family and all living things that walk on mother Earth.’

  Nantinki Young , 27, Santee, South Dakota: ‘I support the camp by providing energy and strength through the meals we prepare each day. I make sure everyone that comes here has something to eat even if it’s just a snack in between meals.’

Nantinki Young, 27, Santee, South Dakota: ‘I support the camp by providing energy and strength through the meals we prepare each day. I make sure everyone that comes here has something to eat even if it’s just a snack in between meals.’

  Jon Don Ilone Reed , 30, Black Hills, South Dakota: ‘I got the call to come out and fight for our water and indigenous rights, so I’m here to protect them.’

Jon Don Ilone Reed, 30, Black Hills, South Dakota: ‘I got the call to come out and fight for our water and indigenous rights, so I’m here to protect them.’

  Jusilea Charger , 20, Eagle Butte, South Dakota: ‘I would do anything for our children, so now I have to fight so they won’t have to later. We continue to stand strong for generations to come.’

Jusilea Charger, 20, Eagle Butte, South Dakota: ‘I would do anything for our children, so now I have to fight so they won’t have to later. We continue to stand strong for generations to come.’

  Dallas Goldtooth , 33, Chicago: ‘The Dakota Access Pipeline affects the relationship between the US federal government and tribes immensely. Based on treaties the Oceti Sakowin were to retain much of the land the pipeline crosses. The government has a responsibility to honor those treaties.’

Dallas Goldtooth, 33, Chicago: ‘The Dakota Access Pipeline affects the relationship between the US federal government and tribes immensely. Based on treaties the Oceti Sakowin were to retain much of the land the pipeline crosses. The government has a responsibility to honor those treaties.’

  Kelli Love , 31, Maui, Hawaii: ‘Water is the source of all life. Being a mother, it is my responsibility to do my best to give my child a life as good as I had, if not better. I want him to be able to swim in clean rivers, laugh and play as I did when I was his age. That is why I came here to stand with the Lakota people, to protect our water.’

Kelli Love, 31, Maui, Hawaii: ‘Water is the source of all life. Being a mother, it is my responsibility to do my best to give my child a life as good as I had, if not better. I want him to be able to swim in clean rivers, laugh and play as I did when I was his age. That is why I came here to stand with the Lakota people, to protect our water.’

  Byron Shorty , 24, Flagstaff, Arizona: ‘Our tribes fight for the same thing, Tó [water] which is sacred to us. Many of our clans and places are related to water. We are here in Standing Rock to be with our relatives during this effort and to give our support.’

Byron Shorty, 24, Flagstaff, Arizona: ‘Our tribes fight for the same thing, Tó [water] which is sacred to us. Many of our clans and places are related to water. We are here in Standing Rock to be with our relatives during this effort and to give our support.’

  Standing Fox , 31, San Carlos, Arizona: ‘Sacred land is who we are and is also a reference to our ways. When land is destroyed we lose that connection. So when any land is threatened it is important to protect it.’

Standing Fox, 31, San Carlos, Arizona: ‘Sacred land is who we are and is also a reference to our ways. When land is destroyed we lose that connection. So when any land is threatened it is important to protect it.’

  Naelyn Pike , 17, San Carlos Apache reservation: ‘Our ancestors are looking at the people with tears in their eyes because they know all the pain and suffering yet to come. They know there is no tomorrow for those yet to be born.’
  Vincent Night Horse Fox , 25, White Shield, North Dakota: ‘I come to support Standing Rock to fight against the pipeline. I want clean water for my family and all living things that walk on mother Earth.’
  Nantinki Young , 27, Santee, South Dakota: ‘I support the camp by providing energy and strength through the meals we prepare each day. I make sure everyone that comes here has something to eat even if it’s just a snack in between meals.’
  Jon Don Ilone Reed , 30, Black Hills, South Dakota: ‘I got the call to come out and fight for our water and indigenous rights, so I’m here to protect them.’
  Jusilea Charger , 20, Eagle Butte, South Dakota: ‘I would do anything for our children, so now I have to fight so they won’t have to later. We continue to stand strong for generations to come.’
  Dallas Goldtooth , 33, Chicago: ‘The Dakota Access Pipeline affects the relationship between the US federal government and tribes immensely. Based on treaties the Oceti Sakowin were to retain much of the land the pipeline crosses. The government has a responsibility to honor those treaties.’
  Kelli Love , 31, Maui, Hawaii: ‘Water is the source of all life. Being a mother, it is my responsibility to do my best to give my child a life as good as I had, if not better. I want him to be able to swim in clean rivers, laugh and play as I did when I was his age. That is why I came here to stand with the Lakota people, to protect our water.’
  Byron Shorty , 24, Flagstaff, Arizona: ‘Our tribes fight for the same thing, Tó [water] which is sacred to us. Many of our clans and places are related to water. We are here in Standing Rock to be with our relatives during this effort and to give our support.’
  Standing Fox , 31, San Carlos, Arizona: ‘Sacred land is who we are and is also a reference to our ways. When land is destroyed we lose that connection. So when any land is threatened it is important to protect it.’

Naelyn Pike, 17, San Carlos Apache reservation: ‘Our ancestors are looking at the people with tears in their eyes because they know all the pain and suffering yet to come. They know there is no tomorrow for those yet to be born.’

Vincent Night Horse Fox, 25, White Shield, North Dakota: ‘I come to support Standing Rock to fight against the pipeline. I want clean water for my family and all living things that walk on mother Earth.’

Nantinki Young, 27, Santee, South Dakota: ‘I support the camp by providing energy and strength through the meals we prepare each day. I make sure everyone that comes here has something to eat even if it’s just a snack in between meals.’

Jon Don Ilone Reed, 30, Black Hills, South Dakota: ‘I got the call to come out and fight for our water and indigenous rights, so I’m here to protect them.’

Jusilea Charger, 20, Eagle Butte, South Dakota: ‘I would do anything for our children, so now I have to fight so they won’t have to later. We continue to stand strong for generations to come.’

Dallas Goldtooth, 33, Chicago: ‘The Dakota Access Pipeline affects the relationship between the US federal government and tribes immensely. Based on treaties the Oceti Sakowin were to retain much of the land the pipeline crosses. The government has a responsibility to honor those treaties.’

Kelli Love, 31, Maui, Hawaii: ‘Water is the source of all life. Being a mother, it is my responsibility to do my best to give my child a life as good as I had, if not better. I want him to be able to swim in clean rivers, laugh and play as I did when I was his age. That is why I came here to stand with the Lakota people, to protect our water.’

Byron Shorty, 24, Flagstaff, Arizona: ‘Our tribes fight for the same thing, Tó [water] which is sacred to us. Many of our clans and places are related to water. We are here in Standing Rock to be with our relatives during this effort and to give our support.’

Standing Fox, 31, San Carlos, Arizona: ‘Sacred land is who we are and is also a reference to our ways. When land is destroyed we lose that connection. So when any land is threatened it is important to protect it.’

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